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'Doc didn't spot deadly blood clot'

PUBLISHED: 17:07 03 March 2010 | UPDATED: 11:32 23 August 2010

ANGRY: Ivan visited a walk in centre

ANGRY: Ivan visited a walk in centre

AN investigation has been launched after a furious patient slammed a walk-in surgery claiming a misdiagnosis could have cost him his life. Ivan Dunt, 59, says he is shocked that the doctor he saw at White Horse surgery in Northfleet failed to recognise

AN investigation has been launched after a furious patient slammed a walk-in surgery claiming a 'misdiagnosis' could have cost him his life.

Ivan Dunt, 59, says he is shocked that the doctor he saw at White Horse surgery in Northfleet failed to recognise he was suffering from Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT).

The potentially fatal blood clot was in his leg which if it had moved to his heart or brain would have killed him.

He said: "My leg was completely solid. He said it was like something he had never seen before but then just said it was probably a torn muscle and I should rest it.

"I went through a weekend of agony, of crawling on all fours to get to the toilet. When I called my GP on the Monday he came out and immediately told me it was DVT."

Mr Dunt, of Newton Abbot Road, Northfleet, is particularly angered that he was not given a Heparin injection which would not have harmed him if it was not a clot but could have saved his life if the DVT worsened.

His GP, Dr Raj Shah also told the Reporter he was surprised the injection was not administered and agreed to speak out about the incident to prevent further occurrences.

He said: "The most important thing in a case like this would be to look for deep vein thrombosis. All he needed was a type of blood test that is made available to all GPs. Even if it was not DVT, Heparin would do not harm so it should be administered just in case."

Mr Dunt, who is taking daily Warfarin tablets, which thins the blood, explained that he first felt the pain while working in his shed in December.

He said: "I felt a sharp cramp like pain in my left calf. It was so painful and I knew something was wrong."

Attending Gravesend hospital, he says he was told there was no one available and he must go to the clinic for treatment.

He added: "It is ridiculous that a hospital doesn't have doctors. This whole episode has left me very worried and I will be making a full complaint to the PCT." Dr Caroline Jessel, NHS West Kent's deputy medical director, said: "NHS West Kent was concerned to learn about this incident and will ensure a thorough investigation is carried out involving all the NHS services which provided care to the patient.

"The NHS complaints process will be followed as part of this and once all the facts are clear and their implications analysed, lessons learnt will be shared with the patient.

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