Search

Doghouse for crufts

PUBLISHED: 17:16 17 September 2008 | UPDATED: 10:07 23 August 2010

A VET S practice manager supports the RSPCA in boycotting Crufts over claims the judging criteria for pedigrees encourages the breeding of deformed, diseased or disabled dogs. The animal welfare charity announced on Monday that it is to withdraw its stan

A VET'S practice manager supports the RSPCA in boycotting Crufts over claims the judging criteria for pedigrees encourages the breeding of deformed, diseased or disabled dogs.

The animal welfare charity announced on Monday that it is to withdraw its stand at the world famous dog show.

Charity bosses say the intentional breeding of deformed or disabled dogs and culture of inbreeding animals is having a worrying effect on the health and welfare of hundreds of thousands of pedigree dogs.

Nicky Jackson, 40, practice manager of Parrock Street Veterinary, Parrock Street, Gravesend, said: "I would support them 100 per cent. Someone has definitely got to make a stand.

"There are breeders who keep breeding with dogs who are known to have problems. There are dogs that have difficulty breathing, dogs with hip and elbow dysplasia, the list goes on and on."

The move comes after a BBC documentary, Pedigree Dogs Exposed, alleged that unhealthy and sometimes inbred dogs were sometimes named best in breed.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with syringomyelia, a condition in which the dog's skull is too small for its brain, boxer dogs with epilepsy, pugs with breathing problems and bulldogs which were unable to mate or give birth unassisted were all featured in the programme.

Mrs Jackson said the problem is down to the breed standards which are published by the Kennel Club and give guidelines on what the perfect example of each breed should look like.

She said: "Unless the Kennel Club change the breed standards it isn't going to change. The breeders pick on a particular trait so if a dog has good ears they will breed it with another that has good ears even if it is its daughter."

The Kennel Club, organisers of Crufts, claim that 90 per cent of pedigree dogs do not suffer from health problems which have a negative effect on theirs lives and that despite claims to the contrary the breed standards are blueprints for healthy dogs.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club spokesperson, said: "The club is dedicated to improving the health and welfare of dogs through responsible breeding and will continue to use Crufts as a platform to educate breeders and the public about the importance of joining us on this quest."

jason.goodyer@archant.co.uk

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Gravesend Reporter

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists