Search

Film focus on power station eco-warriors

PUBLISHED: 15:08 17 June 2009 | UPDATED: 10:46 23 August 2010

UK ENGLAND HOO 8OCT07 - A Greenpeace activist climbs over the side of the smoke stack atKingsnorth coal-fired power station near Rochester in Kent. They have immobilised the conveyor belt that carries coal into the plant by hitting emergency stop buttons and chaining themselves to machinery. A second group has climbed 1000 steps to the top of the chimney and they are painting the words Gordon bin it onto the outside.

jre/Photo by Will Rose/Greenpeace

UK ENGLAND HOO 8OCT07 - A Greenpeace activist climbs over the side of the smoke stack atKingsnorth coal-fired power station near Rochester in Kent. They have immobilised the conveyor belt that carries coal into the plant by hitting emergency stop buttons and chaining themselves to machinery. A second group has climbed 1000 steps to the top of the chimney and they are painting the words Gordon bin it onto the outside. jre/Photo by Will Rose/Greenpeace

Will Rose/Greenpeace

ECO campaigners who found themselves in court after scaling a 220m power station chimney stack in protest against climate change are the subject of a film by an acclaimed documentary maker, writes Jason Goodyer. In October 2007 the so-called Kingsnorth S

ECO campaigners who found themselves in court after scaling a 220m power station chimney stack in protest against climate change are the subject of a film by an acclaimed documentary maker, writes Jason Goodyer.

In October 2007 the so-called Kingsnorth Six climbed to the top of Kingsnorth Power Station, on the Hoo Pennisula, painted the words 'Gordon Bin It' down the side of a chimney and attempted to close the station.

Accused of causing £30,000 worth of criminal damage the six appeared at Maidstone Crown Court last September but were later cleared.

Their actions were in protest to plans by energy company E.ON to build the first new coal fired power station since 1983 at Kingsnorth, sparking fears of pollution in north Kent.

Inspired by their story internationally acclaimed filmmaker Nick Broomfield, who found fame with hit documentaries Biggie and Tupac, Kurt and Courtney and Battle for Haditha has produced a 20-minute film titled A Time Comes detailing the events.

He said: "Obviously offering your services for a film is not exactly direct action but it's doing something that is long overdue.

"People need to feel that they need to be involved themselves directly rather than relying on other people to do it for them. I suppose this was my own little step in that direction."

In a landmark judgement the men were acquitted of wrongdoing when the jury accepted their defence of lawful excuse - meaning that by committing the crime they prevented damage to the world's ecosystems by reducing climate change.

Made up of a mix of news and police footage and interviews with the protestors the film details the case and is supported by a testimony by leading climate scientist Dr James Hansen of NASA.

The director brought together a first class team to produce the film including editor Ian Davies and co-producer Michelle Thomas. Drawn to the material and the prospect of working with Broomfield, everyone on the picture gave their time for free.

The film is available for free viewing by visiting www.greenpeace.org.uk now.

jason.goodyer@archant.co.uk

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Gravesend Reporter

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists