Search

Health chiefs pledge to end MRSA curse

PUBLISHED: 17:40 04 June 2008 | UPDATED: 09:49 23 August 2010

HEALTH bosses plan to end avoidable hospital acquired MRSA cases by 2018 as part of a series of ambitious pledges. NHS South East Coast announced a 10 year vision for residents across Kent, Surrey and Sussex on Monday. Included in the measures were bol

HEALTH bosses plan to end avoidable hospital acquired MRSA cases by 2018 as part of a series of ambitious pledges.

NHS South East Coast announced a 10 year vision for residents across Kent, Surrey and Sussex on Monday.

Included in the measures were bold cuts in cases of C-difficile, specialist centres for stroke and heart attack patients and tackling obesity a top priority.

Chief executive Candy Morris unveiled the Healthier People, Excellent Care document.

She said: "These pledges are bold and ambitious - we are proud to have such high aspirations. Our aim is to ensure everyone in Kent, Surrey and Sussex enjoys the best of health and gets the very best care. But we can't achieve this goal alone.

"No one person, group or organisation holds all the answers. This is why we have been working with people across the region including doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers.

"We want to hear the views, ideas and experiences of everyone who uses and works in the NHS to help us shape services for the future. We want to help you stay healthy and get the best care in the coming decade."

A variety of local clinicians, with views from residents and patients helped to create the plan.

Eight key pledges have been made. They include having no avoidable hospital acquired infections by 2011, there will be no avoidable cases of hospital acquired MRSA and less than 2,000 cases of C.difficile.

By 2010, strokes, heart attacks and major injuries will always be treated in specialist centres.

Patients will be able to have medical tests to help diagnose and manage their illness on the high street or at home and all patients will hold their own medical records.

The trust will turn the tide on the rising numbers of obese people and special programmes to help people cope better with long-term conditions such as diabetes will be widely available

Most dying people will be able to die where they prefer - at home, in a hospital or hospice

The differences in life expectancy seen in the South East Coast area will be addressed so that all men can expect to live at least 78.6 years and women 82.5 years

About 4.2 million people live in the region covered by NHS South East Coast.

Michael.adkins@archant.co.uk

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Gravesend Reporter

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists