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Matt Damon: 'Director saved my career'

PUBLISHED: 14:00 25 November 2009 | UPDATED: 11:14 23 August 2010

A HOLLYWOOD actor has admitted a franchise of films helped his career get out of the doldrums. Matt Damon has revealed that his career was at a low point before he was singed up to appear as the lead character in the Bourne trilogy. Damon is in talks

A HOLLYWOOD actor has admitted a franchise of films helped his career get out of the doldrums.

Matt Damon has revealed that his career was at a low point before he was singed up to appear as the lead character in the Bourne trilogy.

Damon is in talks to star in fourth of the franchise with Gravesend-born director Paul Greengrass, who has already made two of the previous films.

The fourth film, if made, is due to be released in 2011. It was seven years ago when Damon career was reignited when he starred in The Bourne Identity.

This came after he appeared in successive flops Gerry, The Majestic and Confessions of a Dangerous Mind.

He said: "It's incalculable how much this character and these movies have helped my career.

"Suddenly it put me on a shortlist of people who could get movies made. Since then, I have been able to do films that had wonderful scripts but on the face of it were not going to be box office successes like Syriana, The Departed and The Good Shepherd.

"I had the luxury of jumping on all three of them because I knew I was going to have another chance to do the Bourne character. I've been around long enough to fall in and out of favour, and it's been instructional for me.

"Directing is something I really want to do but the parts I'm getting now and the directors and producers I'm working with are so great that I'm not in any hurry."

Damon is currently filming The Adjustment Bureau, about a politician who falls for a mysterious ballerina, played by Emily Blunt, and has already completed work on Clint Eastwood's forthcoming Invictus.

Award-winning director Paul Greengrass, 53, boasts an impressive CV of films including United 93, a gritty film about the 9/11 terror attacks in America.

Known for his signature use of hand-held cameras, he began his film-making career in current affairs television, making a series of hard-hitting drama-documentaries.

These included The Murder of Stephen Lawrence, about the racist killing of the black teenager in Eltham, and Bloody Sunday, on the 1972 killing of 14 civil right marchers by British troops in Northern Ireland.

marina.soteriou

@archant.co.uk

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