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MP reveals cabbie's gossip led to war

PUBLISHED: 16:17 09 December 2009 | UPDATED: 11:18 23 August 2010

CLAIMS the decision to go to war in Iraq was based on evidence from a taxi driver have been revealed in a scathing dossier. Gravesham MP Adam Holloway, a former serviceman, made the revelations in a report titled: The Failure of British Political and Mil

CLAIMS the decision to go to war in Iraq was based on evidence from a taxi driver have been revealed in a scathing dossier.

Gravesham MP Adam Holloway, a former serviceman, made the revelations in a report titled: The Failure of British Political and Military Leadership in Iraq.

He says the Labour Government, led by the then PM Tony Blair, based their decision on Government intelligence over the presence of weapons of mass destruction from a cabbie working on the Iraqi-Jordanian border who had overheard a conversation two years earlier.

The Conservative MP also states that this was acknowledged and ignored in an intelligence report that stated: "It was flagged up that part of the report probably describing some missiles that the Iraqi Government allegedly possessed was demonstrably untrue. They verifiably did not exist."

His dossier goes on to question why such errors were not mentioned, concluding that senior army officials were afraid to lose rank and importance by going against the Government's wishes

He says: "Those telling you you're not on the right track get kicked off the team... Top leaders will always get the intelligence they want," he says. "When the heads of the Armed Forces start actively parroting political propaganda and burying inconvenient truths on behalf of the Government, a serious line has been crossed."

The ten-page article has been published on the website of think-tank First Defence.

Mr Holloway says he received his shocking information from senior intelligence staff who wished to remain anonymous.

His claims support those made in previous inquiries into the evidence used by the Government to argue for war by Lord Butler in 2004.

In Butler's report questions are raised over the methods in checking reliability of sources used by MI6.

Mr Holloway concludes by calling for the UK to learn from its mistakes and institute important change in the way it conducts its military decisions and strategies.

He added: "It is never too late to learn the lessons of Iraq, though the insight of many who were there is being buried under the rubble of spin and cover-up.

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