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Queen’s man: I fight cancer with an extreme aggression

PUBLISHED: 16:57 26 May 2010 | UPDATED: 11:43 23 August 2010

DETERMINED: Lord Lieutenant Allan Willett.

DETERMINED: Lord Lieutenant Allan Willett.

THE Queen s representative in Kent is expected to have an operation today to remove a tumour after a sudden recurrence of prostate cancer. Before he was admitted to hospital The Lord Lieutenant of Kent, Allan Willett CMG, said he would fight the illness

THE Queen's representative in Kent is expected to have an operation today to remove a tumour after a sudden recurrence of prostate cancer.

Before he was admitted to hospital The Lord Lieutenant of Kent, Allan Willett CMG, said he would fight the illness with "extreme aggression".

The setback comes 14 years after he battled the disease and will be followed by a course of radiotherapy.

Recently he was diagnosed with a suspected form of Parkinsonism, which affects his balance, mobility and energy levels but is not life threatening.

He said: "My attitude has always been to treat this cancer with extreme aggression, as I am doing now.

"After the treatment I am determined to carry out my duties as The Queen's representative for Kent for the full term of my appointment, which ends in August 2011 when I will be 75."

While he is undergoing treatment his duties will be carried out by his Vice-Lord Lieutenant, Lord De L'Isle MBE DL, and his county-wide team of Deputy Lieutenants.

He is expected to resume full duties as The Queen's representative in the county until the end of August next year.

Mr Willett added: "During my enforced absence I have every confidence that all members of my excellent lieutenancy team will continue their good work for Kent's communities."

The philanthropist, former international businessman and founding chairman of the South East England Development Agency (SEEDA) was appointed Lord Lieutenant in 2002.

Since then he and his wife Anne have carried out hundreds of engagements throughout the county, from welcoming royal visitors to promoting community volunteering and campaigning for greater public support for the armed forces and their families.

Three years ago he stood down as chairman of Canterbury Cathedral Trust Fund on medical advice after being diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, which affected the regularity of his heartbeat.

Treatment for this condition has been successful.


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