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Residents of true blue borough: We did not vote for this'

PUBLISHED: 17:58 13 May 2010 | UPDATED: 11:42 23 August 2010

GARY MILLS: voter.

GARY MILLS: voter.

LOYAL Tory voters in the borough have slammed Prime Minister David Cameron for conceding to wobbly Liberals after forming the first coalition government in 70 years. Traditional Conservative supporters across Gravesham say he should have formed a mino

RONALD STANFORD: voter.

LOYAL Tory voters in the borough have slammed Prime Minister David Cameron for conceding to "wobbly Liberals" after forming the first coalition government in 70 years.

Traditional Conservative supporters across Gravesham say he should have formed a minority government and called for another general election.

They accused the 43-year-old, the youngest Prime Minister since Lord Liverpool nearly 200 years ago, of hypocrisy after yielding to the Lib Dems when they have been "battling against them for the past four weeks."

Ronald Stanford, 62, of Chalky Bank, Gravesend, said: "The only way it is going to be sorted is to have another general election in October. The right wing of the Tory party won't like a coalition with the Lib Dems.

"It is terrible what is going on with Nick Clegg. Why should we get involved with wobbly liberals now when we have been battling against them for the past four weeks?

David Cameron was installed as Prime Minister on Tuesday night, on a dramatic day that also saw Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg announced as his deputy.

It followed Gordon Brown's resignation as Prime Minister, bringing to an end 13 years of Labour rule.

A poll conducted by the Reporter on Tuesday, the day after Mr Brown announced his resignation as Labour leader, an overwhelming 78 per cent of voters thought he had made the right decision to stand down.

As the Reporter went to press, it was announced that four other Lib Dems will take cabinet posts in what is the first coalition government in the UK for 70 years. Beverley West, 53, of Hollybush Road, Gravesend, said: "I'm not happy with it. Their views conflict sometimes, so I don't know how they are going to agree.

"The Liberal Democrats want more immigration but the Tories tend to want to limit it. I certainly hope David Cameron wins on that.

Retired Thomas Bartholomew, of Regents Court, Gravesend, said: "I would sooner have seen a straight outright win for the Tories.

"I don't think they will agree very much, they have always seemed to have been arguing in the past. They have got to do something quite quickly about the state of the country. We have got to get rid of that big debt.

"I also think immigration should be a number one priority."

Gary Mills, 57, of Milton Road, Gravesend, said: "I'm not certain we can predict how this is going to go. We are just going to have to wait and see.

"The main thing is they need to move quickly to tackle the issues.

A tense power struggle gripped British politics after neither Labour nor the Tories failed to secure the 326 seats needed to form a majority government in last Thursdays General Election.

Following days of talks between the Tories and Lib Dems, and also the Lib Dems and Labour on forming a new government, a deal was reached on Tuesday that resulted in Labour Prime Minister Gordon Brown resigning.

After Mr Brown stepped down as Labour leader on Monday night voters in Gravesham said he had made the right decision.

Ken McHale, of Wrotham Road, Gravesend, said: "I think the decision has come a week too late. It is staggering it took him this long to come to the conclusion that it was the only thing to do.

"It really is about time all the parties honour their pre-election promises to put the country first instead of all this bickering and negotiating.

Pat Jacob, 70, of Spencer Street, Gravesend, said: "He should have gone years ago. He was a totally unelected and unwanted Prime Minister.

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